Roosevelt University’s Schaumburg Campus is Awarded Level I Arboretum Accreditation

As the leaves change to picturesque colors and the crisp breeze carries them away, I cannot help but reflect upon what an enthusing summer it was this year. While working as an Environmental Sustainability Student Associate at Roosevelt, I was given a seemingly simple task: Apply for, and attain arboretum accreditation through the Morton Arboretum in Lisle, IL.
Some of you may have already heard, but Roosevelt University’s Schaumburg Campu s was accredited as a Level I Arboretum in September of this year. You can visit ArbNet to view a list of Level I-III Accreditation requirements. I’m sure you’re wondering what Roosevelt did to achieve this recognition and why it is important. The thing is, being an arboretum is not just a simple achievement – it is an accumulation of successes met with long-term commitment and community involvement.
One of Roosevelt’s main goals is to create an atmosphere where everyone can come enjoy the sustainable landscape and learn how they can employ sustainable practices at their homes. The growing biodiversity being cultivated at the Schaumburg campus provides a display of how to strategically choose and place the right species.
Roosevelt University’s complete landscape inventory is based upon field-based assessments, as a means to measure the physical structure and condition of each tree. This information is used for landscape management by connecting forest functions and values with management costs, risks, and needs. At present, the Schaumburg campus has 33 documented trees species. We are in the process of # tagging and recording a detailed description of ~516 woody plants to assess the condition and maintenance needs of each.
Many people have contributed to the preservation and evolution of the Schaumburg campus’s living library of trees and plants. I am thankful to have had the opportunity to present their sustainable deeds to the Morton Arboretum so that Roosevelt University can be recognized for its outstanding achievements to reduce climate impact as a (sub) urban community.

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